Pathway

Texas Bar Examination Pathway

The information provided here is organized differently than it is in the other Pathways, because students should determine the sequencing of their elective courses as a function of their intended law practice goals.  Thus, they should be guided by the relevant Career Pathway in deciding the sequence in which they take courses.  There is, therefore, no one-size-fits-all order in which students should take courses related to the Texas Bar Examination.  For example, a student preparing for an estate planning practice may choose to take Wills, Trusts, and Estates during his or her second (full-time) year of law school in order to be prepared to take the Estate and Gift Tax and Estate Planning courses during the third (full-time) year, while a student preparing for a career doing business transactional work may choose to take Corporations and Secured Transactions in his or her second (full-time) year in order to take one of the Capstone Transactional Skills courses in the third (full-time) year.

Accordingly, the following tables identify the specific subjects tested on the Texas Bar Examination and show the corresponding courses offered at South Texas College of Law, indicating whether they are Required or Elective courses.  The bar exam subjects are organized by the day on which they are examined on the Texas Bar Examination.  So, for example, the South Texas courses correlated with subjects tested on the Multistate Bar Examination appear in the table for Wednesday.

You will observe that the South Texas College of Law Houston courses related to the subjects tested on both the Multistate Bar Examination and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination are all part of the required law school curriculum.  In addition, all the courses corresponding with subjects tested on the Multistate Essay Examination (except for Conflict of Laws) also are a part of the required law school curriculum, although full-time students whose cumulative GPA is 3.000 or higher immediately after having attempted 30 credit hours or having completed 2 semesters, whichever occurs first, and part-time students whose cumulative GPA is 3.000 or higher immediately after having attempted 30 semester hours or having completed 4 semesters or sessions, whichever occurs first, may elect not to take one or more of the following courses:  Agency & Partnership; Corporations; Family Law; Secured Transactions; and Wills, Trusts, & Estates.  Nevertheless, the faculty strongly recommends that all students take each of these courses, even if they are eligible to opt out of doing so, because of their importance to law practice and their relevance to the Texas Bar Examination.

Print Pathway for Reference

Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination

  • Subjects Tested
    • Professional Responsibility and Judicial Conduct

      50 multiple-choice questions

TUESDAY – THE MULTISTATE PERFORMANCE TEST

  • Subjects Tested
    • Multistate Performance Test (MPT)

      Preparation of an assigned lawyer work product

TUESDAY – THE MULTISTATE ESSAY EXAMINATION

  • Subjects Tested
    • Business Associations

      Essay


    • Conflict of Laws

      Essay


    • Family Law

      Essay


    • Trusts and Estates

      Essay


    • Secured Transactions

      Essay


    • All Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) Subjects

      Essay (See Wednesday for MBE-related Questions)

WEDNESDAY – MULTISTATE BAR EXAMINATION SUBJECTS

  • Subjects Tested
    • Civil Procedure

      25 multiple-choice questions


    • Constitutional Law

      25 multiple-choice questions


    • Contracts

      25 multiple-choice questions


    • Criminal Law & Criminal Procedure

      25 multiple-choice questions)


    • Evidence

      25 multiple-choice questions


    • Real Property

      25 multiple-choice questions


    • Torts

      25 multiple-choice questions

*Because taxation and bankruptcy are tested only as crossover topics on the Texas Bar Examination, students should consider taking these elective courses if they contribute to their career pathway preparation but should not do so solely as preparation for the bar examination.